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dc.contributor.editorWagoner, Nevadaen_US
dc.creatorBartlett, Zaneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-26T21:11:05Z
dc.date.available2015-01-26T21:11:05Z
dc.date.created2015-01-26en_US
dc.date.issued2015-01-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/8283
dc.description.abstractCarol Widney Greider studied telomeres and telomerase in the US at the turn of the twenty-first century. She worked primarily at the University of California, Berkeley in Berkeley, California. She received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2009, along with Elizabeth Blackburn and Jack Szostak, for their research on telomeres and telomerase. Telomeres are repetitive sequences of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that protect chromosomes from tangling, and they provide some protection from mutations. Greider also studied telomerase, an enzyme that repairs telomeres. Without telomeres, chromosomes are subject to mutations that can lead to cell death, and without telomerase, cells might not reproduce fast enough during embryonic development. Greider's research on telomeres helped scientists explain how chromosomes function within cells.en_US
dc.subjectPeopleen_US
dc.subject.lcshGreider, Carol W.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen Nobel Prize winnersen_US
dc.subject.lcshNobel Prize winnersen_US
dc.subject.lcshTelomeraseen_US
dc.subject.lcshTelomereen_US
dc.subject.lcshChromosomesen_US
dc.subject.lcshMolecular biologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshBiological Laboratory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.)en_US
dc.subject.lcshGeneticsen_US
dc.subject.lcshRNAen_US
dc.subject.lcshDNAen_US
dc.subject.lcshchromosomesen_US
dc.subject.lcshBlackburn, Elizabeth H.en_US
dc.titleCarol Widney Greider (1961-)en_US
dc.subject.embryoPeopleen_US
dc.subject.tagtelomeresen_US


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