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dc.contributor.editorElliott, Steveen_US
dc.creatorHall, Brian K.en_US
dc.creatorBarnes, M. Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T15:16:31Z
dc.date.available2014-08-21T15:16:31Z
dc.date.created2014-08-21en_US
dc.date.issued2014-08-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/8154
dc.descriptionObject is a digitized image line drawings that depict the formation of neural crest cells in vertebrates. Image has six sub images, which depict six stages, labeled (a) through (f), of the neural plate as it folds to form the neural tube, neural crest cells, and a sheet of extoderm. Arrows between the six subimages indicate developmental processes for different taxa. The path from (a) to (b) to (c) represents the process in rats. The path (a) to (b) to (d) to (f) represents the process in birds. The path (a) to (b) to (e) to (f) represents the process in amphibians.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis diagram shows how NCCs migrate differently in rats, birds and amphibians. The arrows represent both chronology of NCCs migration and the differential paths that NCCs follow in different classes of animals. The solid black portion of each illustration represents the neural crest, and the large black dots in (c) and in (f) represent the neural crest cells. The speckled sections that at first form a basin in (a) and then close to form a tube in (f) represent the neural ectoderm. The solid white portions represent the epidermal ectoderm. During the neurula stage of all vertebrate embryos (a), the neural crest is located in two places on the neural plate. As the neural tube forms (b), a process called neurulation, the neural crest moves with the folding plate as it forms the junction between the neural and epidermal ectoderm. NCCs migrate differently in different classes of vertebrates (c-f). For instance, in rats (c), the NCCs migrate away from the neural crest before neurulation completes and while the neural fold is still open. In birds (d and f), neural crest cells do not migrate until the neural fold closes. In amphibians (e and f), the neural crest cells migrate after neurulation completes, and only after the cells have accumulated above the neural tube. Subsequently, NCCs will all migrate down their specialized pathways and diversify into the several sub-types of NCCs.en_US
dc.formatjpeg/tiffen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subject.lcshNeural cresten_US
dc.subject.lcshEmbryosen_US
dc.subject.lcshVertebratesen_US
dc.subject.meshGerm Layersen_US
dc.subject.meshEctodermen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurulationen_US
dc.titleThe Development of the Neural Crest and the Migration of Neural Crest Cells (NCCs) in the Embryos of Various Vertebratesen_US
dc.typeImageen_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoTheoriesen_US
dc.subject.embryoProcessesen_US
dc.subject.tagneural crest cellsen_US
dc.description.typeGraphicsen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2014-08-21en_US
dc.relation.referencesHall, Brian Keith. The Neural Crest: Including a Facsimile Reprint of The Neural Crest by Sven H_rstadius. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.en_US
dc.description.procedureImage hand drawn by Hall for Hall (1988). Image touched up in Adobe Photoshop Creative Suite (CS) 6 on a iMac computer with operating system OS X 10.6.8. in summer 2013. Caption written by Barnes in Fall 2013.en_US


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