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dc.contributor.editorTantibanchachai, Chanapaen_US
dc.creatorCohmer, Seanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-03T18:13:45Z
dc.date.available2014-05-03T18:13:45Z
dc.date.created2014-05-03en_US
dc.date.issued2014-05-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/7827
dc.description.abstractBernard Rimland studied autism in children in the United States in the second half of the twentieth century. His early research in the 1950s and into the 1960s led him to assert that infantile autism was a neurodevelopmental disorder, or one that is caused by impairments in the growth and development of the brain or central nervous system. Rimland's assertion that infantile autism was a neurodevelopmental disorder contradicted another theory at that time that the condition resulted from emotionally cold parenting. Rimland spent much of his career as a psychology researcher for the United States Navy in Point Loma, California, but in his spare time he researched and wrote about autism, and he advocated for children with autism and their families.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectPeopleen_US
dc.subject.lcshRimland, Bernard, 1928-2006en_US
dc.subject.lcshAutismen_US
dc.subject.lcshAutism spectrum disordersen_US
dc.subject.lcshAutism in childrenen_US
dc.titleBernard Rimland (1928-2006)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoPeopleen_US
dc.subject.tagRefrigerator Motheren_US
dc.subject.tagDevelopmental disorderen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US


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