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dc.contributor.editorCraer, Jennifer R.en_US
dc.creatorO'Brien, Cearaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-23T21:20:46Z
dc.date.available2014-03-23T21:20:46Z
dc.date.created2014-03-23en_US
dc.date.issued2014-03-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/7648
dc.description.abstractBy 2011, researchers in the US had established that non-invasive blood tests can accurately determine the gender of a human fetus as early as seven weeks after fertilization. Experts predicted that this ability may encourage the use of prenatal sex screening tests by women interested to know the gender of their fetuses. As more people begin to use non-invasive blood tests that accurately determine the sex of the fetus at 7 weeks, many ethical questions pertaining to regulation, the consequences of gender-imbalanced societies, and altered meanings of the parent-child relationship.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectContexten_US
dc.subject.lcshSex Determination, Diagnosticen_US
dc.subject.lcshSex Preselectionen_US
dc.subject.lcshfetusen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Determination Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Preselectionen_US
dc.titleSocial Implications of Non-Invasive Blood Tests to Determine the Sex of Fetusesen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoReproductionen_US
dc.subject.embryoEthicsen_US
dc.subject.embryoLegalen_US
dc.subject.tagBlood Testen_US
dc.subject.tagnoninvasive sex determinationen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US


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