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dc.creatorO'Connor, Kathleenen_US
dc.creatorO'Neil, Ericaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-18T23:34:13Z
dc.date.available2013-03-18T23:34:13Z
dc.date.created2012-11-01en_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-18
dc.identifier.otherembryo:129142en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/4201
dc.description.abstractFetal surgeries are a range of medical interventions performed in utero on the developing fetus of a pregnant woman to treat a number of congenital abnormalities. The first documented fetal surgical procedure occurred in 1963 in Auckland, New Zealand when A. William Liley treated fetal hemolytic anemia, or Rh disease, with a blood transfusion. Three surgical techniques comprise many fetal surgeries: hysterotomy, or open abdominal surgery performed on the woman; fetoscopy, for which doctors use a fiber-optic endoscope to view and make repairs to abnormalities in the fetus; and percutaneous fetal theray, for which doctors use a catheter to drain excess fluid. As the sophistication of surgical and neonatal technology advanced in the late twentieth century, so too did the number of congenital disorders fetal surgeons treated, such as mylomeningeocele, blocked urinary tracts, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, polyhydramnios, diaphragmatic hernia, tracheal occlusion, and other anomalies. Many discuss the ethics of fetal surgery, as many consider it contentious, as fetal surgery risks both the developing fetus and the pregnant woman, and at times it only marginally improves patient outcomes. Some argue, however, that as more advanced diagnostic equipment and surgical methods improve, advanced clinical trials in a few conditions may demonstrate more benefits than risks to both pregnant women and fetuses.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectConcepten_US
dc.subject.lcshPatients--Legal status, laws, etc
dc.subject.lcshFetus--Surgery
dc.subject.lcshFetoscopy
dc.subject.lcshUltrasonics in obstetrics
dc.subject.lcshPregnancy
dc.subject.lcshEndoscopy
dc.subject.lcshFetus
dc.subject.lcshBirth defects
dc.subject.lcshFetus--Abnormalities
dc.titleFetal Surgeryen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/)en_US
dc.subject.embryoDisordersen_US
dc.subject.embryoEthicsen_US
dc.subject.embryoReproductionen_US
dc.subject.tagMedical proceduresen_US
dc.subject.tagFetusen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2012-11-01en_US


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