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dc.creatorCaniglia, Guidoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-25T15:48:24Z
dc.date.available2012-05-25T15:48:24Z
dc.date.created2012-01-01en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-25
dc.identifier.otherembryo:128579en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/2319
dc.description.abstractTwo main elements characterize the skeletal morphology of turtles: the carapace and the plastron. For a turtle, the carapacial ridge begins in the embryo as a bulge posterior to the limbs but on both sides of the body. Such outgrowths are the first indication of shell development in turtle embryos. While the exact mechanisms underpinning the formation of the carapacial ridge are still not entirely known, some biologists argue that understanding these embryonic mechanisms is pivotal to explaining both the development of turtles and their evolutionary history.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsen_US
dc.rights© Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectConcepten_US
dc.subject.lcshTurtles
dc.subject.lcshMorphology (Animals)
dc.subject.lcshEmbryos
dc.subject.lcshGerm cells
dc.subject.lcshEmbryological development
dc.subject.lcshEmbryology
dc.subject.lcshEvolution
dc.subject.lcshMesenchyme
dc.subject.lcshGilbert, Scott F., 1949-
dc.subject.lcshDevelopmental biology
dc.subject.lcshgene regulatory networks
dc.titleThe Carapacial Ridge of Turtlesen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subject.embryoProcessesen_US
dc.subject.tagTurtlesen_US
dc.subject.tagEvolutionen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2012-01-01
dc.contributer.editorWellner, Karen


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