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dc.creatorJiang, Lijingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-25T15:48:24Z
dc.date.available2012-05-25T15:48:24Z
dc.date.created2010-11-19en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-25
dc.identifier.otherembryo:128556en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/2314
dc.description.abstractAn important question throughout the history of embryology is whether the formation of a biological structure is predetermined or shaped by its environment. If both intrinsic and environmental controls occur, how exactly do the two processes coordinate in crafting specific forms and functions? When Viktor Hamburger started his PhD study in embryology in the 1920s, few neuroembryologists were investigating how the central neurons innervate peripheral organs. As Hamburger began his research, he had no clue that central-peripheral relations in the development of the central nervous system (CNS) would become one of his major interests for the next seventy-five years. In fact, this research trajectory would lead him to discover programmed cell death as a pivotal mechanism mediating central-peripheral relations, as well as to Nobel-Prize-winning work on nerve growth factors (NGF).en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsen_US
dc.rights© Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectExperimenten_US
dc.subject.lcshHamburger, Viktor, 1900-2001en_US
dc.titleViktor Hamburger's Study of Central-Peripheral Relations in the Development of Nervous Systemen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subject.embryoExperimentsen_US
dc.subject.tagNervous systemen_US
dc.subject.tagCell deathen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2010-11-19


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