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dc.creatorJiang, Lijingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-10T14:06:16Z
dc.date.available2012-05-10T14:06:16Z
dc.date.created2011-03-31en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-10
dc.identifier.otherembryo:128367en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/2089
dc.description.abstractIn September 1979, China's Fifth National People's Congress passed a policy that encouraged one-child families. Following this decision from the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), campaigns were initiated to implement the One-Child Policy nationwide. This initiative constituted the most massive governmental attempt to control human fertility and reproduction in human history. These campaigns prioritized reproductive technologies for contraception, abortion, and sterilization in gynecological and obstetric medicine, while downplaying technologies related to fertility treatment. In the late 1980s, one of the consequences was the reorientation of the rationality of governmental funding for research on human in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rights© Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectContexten_US
dc.titleChina's One-Child Policyen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subject.embryoEthicsen_US
dc.subject.embryoLegalen_US
dc.subject.embryoReproductionen_US
dc.subject.tagFertilityen_US
dc.subject.tagReproductionen_US
dc.subject.tagGovernmenten_US
dc.subject.tagReproductive rightsen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2011-03-31


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