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dc.creatorDeRuiter, Corinneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-10T14:06:13Z
dc.date.available2012-05-10T14:06:13Z
dc.date.created2010-09-12en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-10
dc.identifier.otherembryo:128186en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/2064
dc.description.abstractThe spinal column is the central structure in the vertebrate body from which stability, movement, and posture all derive. The vertebrae of the spine are organized into four regions (listed in order from cranial to caudal): cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and pelvic. These regions are classified by their differences in curvature. The human spine usually consists of thirty-three vertebrae, seven of which are cervical (C1-C7), twelve are thoracic (T1-T12), five are lumbar (L1-L5), and nine are pelvic (five fused as the sacrum and four fused as the coccyx).en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rights© Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectConcepten_US
dc.subject.lcshCongenital diseases.en_US
dc.subject.meshCongenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalitiesen_US
dc.titleCongenital Vertebral Defectsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subject.embryoDisordersen_US
dc.subject.embryoReproductionen_US
dc.subject.tagVertebratesen_US
dc.subject.tagCongenital disordersen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2010-09-12


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