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dc.creatorSmith, Kaitlinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-10T14:02:01Z
dc.date.available2012-05-10T14:02:01Z
dc.date.created2010-06-28en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-10
dc.identifier.otherembryo:127816en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/2017
dc.description.abstractIn 1934 a fourteen-day-old embryo was discovered during a postmortem examination and became famous for being the youngest known human embryo specimen at the time. The embryo was coined "the Yale Embryo," named after the location where it was discovered, Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. During the early twentieth century, the rush to collect embryos as well as to find younger and younger embryos was at an all time high, and the Yale Embryo is representative of the this enthusiasm. The young embryo had a significant impact on human embryo collection and developmental studies as well as on the career of its discoverer.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rights© Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectConcepten_US
dc.titleThe Yale Embryoen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subject.embryoProcessesen_US
dc.subject.embryoReproductionen_US
dc.subject.tagSpecimensen_US
dc.subject.tagHuman developmenten_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2010-06-28


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