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dc.creatorSeward, Sheradenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-10T14:01:54Z
dc.date.available2012-05-10T14:01:54Z
dc.date.created2008-12-03en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-10
dc.identifier.otherembryo:125433en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/1941
dc.description.abstractPrior to 1971, women had some difficulty obtaining contraceptive materials due to a law prohibiting the distribution of contraceptives by anyone other than a registered physician or registered pharmacist. This limited access to contraceptives had an impact on women's reproductive rights and it was the Supreme Court case Eisenstadt v. Baird (1972) that helped bring the issue into the public spotlight. It demonstrated that women's bodies have reproductive as well as anatomical functions, and that the right to privacy extends to those reproductive functions.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rights© Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectLawen_US
dc.titleEisenstadt v. Baird (1972)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subject.embryoLegalen_US
dc.subject.embryoReproductionen_US
dc.subject.tagContraceptionen_US
dc.subject.tagReproductive rightsen_US
dc.subject.tagUS Supreme Courten_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2008-12-03


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