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dc.creatorSunderland, Mary E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-10T13:18:27Z
dc.date.available2012-05-10T13:18:27Z
dc.date.created2008-05-09en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-10
dc.identifier.otherembryo:125155en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/1778
dc.description.abstractThe establishment and growth of developmental-evolutionary biology owes a great debt to the work of John Tyler Bonner. Bonner's studies of cellular slime molds have shed light on some of the big questions of biology including the origins of multicellularity and the nature of morphogenesis. The second child of Lilly Marguerite Stehli and Paul Bonner, John Tyler was born 12 May 1920 in New York City and spent his early years in Locust Valley, Long Island (late 1920s), France (1930), and London (1932). His love for science was ignited as a young boy in England where he was inspired by visits to St. James's Park and the Natural History Museum.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rights© Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectPeopleen_US
dc.subject.lcshBonner, John Tyler.en_US
dc.subject.meshDictyosteliidaen_US
dc.titleJohn Tyler Bonner (1920- )en_US
dc.title.alternativeJohn Bonneren_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subject.embryoPeopleen_US
dc.subject.tagBiographyen_US
dc.subject.tagSlime moldsen_US
dc.subject.tagMorphogenesisen_US
dc.subject.tagMulticellularityen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2008-05-09


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