Now showing items 1-4 of 4

    • "Genetic Evidence Equating SRY and the Testis-Determining Factor" (1990), by Phillippe Berta et al. 

      Cox, Troy (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2014-01-14)
      In the late 1980s, Peter Goodfellow in London, UK led a team of researchers who showed that the SRY gene in humans codes a protein that causes testes to develop in embryos. During this time, scientists in London and Paris, ...
    • "Male Development of Chromosomally Female Mice Transgenic for Sry gene" (1991), by Peter Koopman, et al. 

      Cox, Troy (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2014-01-28)
      Early 1990s research conducted by Peter Koopman, John Gubbay, Nigel Vivian, Peter Goodfellow, and Robin Lovell-Badge, showed that chromosomally female (XX) mice embryos can develop as male with the addition of a genetic ...
    • Sex-determining Region Y in Mammals 

      Cox, Troy (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2013-12-31)
      The Sex-determining Region Y (Sry in mammals but SRY in humans) is a gene found on Y chromosomes that leads to the development of male phenotypes, such as testes. The Sry gene, located on the short branch of the Y chromosome, ...
    • Studies in Spermatogenesis (1905), by Nettie Maria Stevens 

      Cox, Troy (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2014-01-22)
      Studies in Spermatogenesis is a two volume book written by Nettie Maria Stevens, and published by the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1905 and 1906. In the books Stevens explains the research she conducted on chromosomal ...