Now showing items 114-133 of 1026

    • The Cabinet of Frederik Ruysch 

      Martinez, Britta (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2013-05-03)
      Frederik Ruysch's cabinet of curiosities, commonly referred to simply as the Cabinet, was a museum Ruysch created in the Netherlands in the late 160ss. The Cabinet filled a series of small houses that Ruysch rented in ...
    • California Proposition 71 (2004) 

      O'Brien, Ceara (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2014-04-04)
      The California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act, also called Proposition 71, was a ballot initiative proposed by California voters in 2004 to allocate three billion dollars of state funds for stem cell research over ...
    • Calvin Blackman Bridges (1889-1938) 

      Gleason, Kevin
      Calvin Blackman Bridges studied chromosomes and heredity in the US throughout the early twentieth century. Bridges performed research with Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University in New York City, New York, and at the ...
    • Calvin Bridges’ Experiments on Nondisjunction as Evidence for the Chromosome Theory of Heredity (1913-1916) 

      Gleason, Kevin
      From 1913 to 1916, Calvin Bridges performed experiments that indicated genes are found on chromosomes. His experiments were a part of his doctoral thesis advised by Thomas Hunt Morgan in New York, New York. In his experiments, ...
    • Camillo Golgi (1843–1926) 

      Mishqat, Isra
      Camillo Golgi studied the central nervous system during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Italy, and he developed a staining technique to visualize brain cells. Called the black reaction, Golgi’s staining ...
    • Camillo Golgi's Black Reaction for Staining Neurons 

      Mishqat, Isra
      In 1873 Italy, Camillo Golgi created the black reaction technique, which enabled scientists to stain and view the structure of neurons, the specialized cells that compose the nervous system. During the nineteenth century, ...
    • The Carapacial Ridge of Turtles 

      Caniglia, Guido (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-25)
      Two main elements characterize the skeletal morphology of turtles: the carapace and the plastron. For a turtle, the carapacial ridge begins in the embryo as a bulge posterior to the limbs but on both sides of the body. ...
    • Carl Gottfried Hartman (1879-1968) 

      Goodman, Giavonna A. (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      Carl Gottfried Hartman researched the reproductive physiology of opossums and rhesus monkeys. He was the first to extensively study the embryology and physiology of reproduction in opossums when little was known about this ...
    • Carl Richard Moore (1892-1955) 

      Drago, Mary (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2014-02-18)
      Carl Richard Moore was a professor and researcher at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois who studied sex hormones in animals from 1916 until his death in 1955. Moore focused on the role of hormones on sex ...
    • Carnegie Institution of Washington Department of Embryology 

      Wellner, Karen (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-08)
      The Carnegie Institution of Washington's (CIW) Embryology Department was opened in 1914 and remains one of six departments in the CIW. The department quickly became, and remains, world renowned for its many embryonic ...
    • Carnegie Stages 

      Wellner, Karen (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      Historically the exact age of human embryo specimens has long perplexed embryologists. With the menstrual history of the mother often unknown or not exact, and the premenstrual and postmenstrual phases varying considerably ...
    • Carol Downer (1933– ) 

      Horwitz, Rainey
      Carol Downer was a reproductive health and abortion rights activist in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the US and other countries. During the late 1960s, many women reported knowing little about female anatomy ...
    • Carol Widney Greider (1961-) 

      Bartlett, Zane (2015-01-26)
      Carol Widney Greider studied telomeres and telomerase in the US at the turn of the twenty-first century. She worked primarily at the University of California, Berkeley in Berkeley, California. She received the Nobel Prize ...
    • The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering (2007), by Michael J. Sandel 

      Antonios, Nathalie (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      The Case against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering, hereafter referred to as The Case against Perfection, written by Michael J. Sandel, builds on a short essay featured in The Atlantic Monthly magazine ...
    • Caspar Friedrich Wolff (1734-1794) 

      Ruffenach, Stephen (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      Caspar Friedrich Wolff is most famous for his 1759 doctoral dissertation, Theoria Generationis, in which he described embryonic development in both plants and animals as a process involving layers of cells, thereby refuting ...
    • Casti Connubii (1930), by Pope Pius XI 

      Brind'Amour, Katherine (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      "Casti Connubii," a papal encyclical given by Pope Pius XI on 31 December 1930, served primarily as a reaffirmation and expansion of the issues discussed in Arcanum, an encyclical written by Pope Leo XIII. It was released ...
    • Categorization of Conservative, Semi-Conservative, and Dispersive DNA Replication Theories (1953–1956) 

      Hernandez, Victoria
      In 1956, Gunther Stent, a scientist at the University of California Berkeley in Berkeley, California, coined the terms conservative, semi-conservative, and dispersive to categorize the prevailing theories about how DNA ...
    • Catherine DeAngelis (1940– ) 

      Darby, Alexis
      In the late-twentieth century in the United States, Catherine DeAngelis was a pediatric physician, researcher, and editor of multiple medical journals. During her time with the Journal of the American Medical Association, ...
    • "Cell Deaths in Normal Vertebrate Ontogeny" (1951), by Alfred Glücksmann 

      Jiang, Lijing (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-25)
      The review article “Cell Deaths in Normal Vertebrate Ontogeny” (abbreviated as “Cell Deaths”) was published in Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophy Society in 1951. The author, Alfred Glücksmann, was a German ...
    • The Cell in Development and Inheritance (1900), by Edmund Beecher Wilson 

      Mishra, Abhinav; Maienschein, Jane (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2015-06-18)
      The Cell in Development and Inheritance, by Edmund Beecher Wilson, provided a textbook introduction to cell biology for generations of biologists in the twentieth century. In his book, Wilson integrated information about ...