Now showing items 1007-1026 of 1030

    • Wilhelm Friedrich Phillip Pfeffer (1845-1920) 

      Parker, Sara (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2014-11-30)
      Wilhelm Friedrich Phillip Pfeffer studied plants in Germany during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He started his career as an apothecary, but Pfeffer also studied plant physiology, including how plants ...
    • Wilhelm His, Sr. (1831-1904) 

      Buettner, Kimberly A. (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      Wilhelm His, Sr. was born on 9 July 1831 in Basel, Switzerland, to Katharina La Roche and Eduard His. He began his medical studies at Basel in 1849 and later transferred to the University of Bern during the winter semester ...
    • Wilhelm Johannsen's Genotype-Phenotype Distinction 

      Peirson, B. R. Erick (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2013-03-18)
      Wilhelm Johannsen in Denmark first proposed the distinction between genotype and phenotype in the study of heredity in 1909. This distinction is between the hereditary dispositions of organisms (their genotypes) and the ...
    • Wilhelm Ludvig Johannsen (1857-1927) 

      Peirson, B. R. Erick (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2013-03-18)
      Wilhelm Ludvig Johannsen studied plants and helped found the field of genetics, contributing methods and concepts to the study of heredity around the turn of the twentieth century in Denmark. His experiments on heredity ...
    • Wilhelm Roux (1850-1924) 

      Kearl, Megan (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      Wilhelm Roux was a nineteenth-century experimental embryologist who was best known for pioneering Entwicklungsmechanik, or developmental mechanics. Roux was born in Jena, Germany, on 9 June 1850, the only son of Clotilde ...
    • William Bateson (1861-1926) 

      Hauserman, Samantha (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2014-01-30)
      At the turn of the twentieth century, William Bateson studied organismal variation and heredity of traits within the framework of evolutionary theory in England. Bateson applied Gregor Mendel's work to Charles Darwin's ...
    • William Harvey (1578-1657) 

      Lopez, Angel (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      Renowned physician and scientist William Harvey is best known for his accurate description of how blood circulates through the body. While his published work on the circulation of blood is considered the most important of ...
    • William Keith Brooks (1848-1908) 

      Smith, Kaitlin (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-08)
      Biologist William Keith Brooks studied embryological development in invertebrates and used his results as evidence for theories of evolution and ancestral heredity. He founded a marine biological laboratory where his and ...
    • William Smellie (1697–1763) 

      Tran, Yvette
      William Smellie helped to incorporate scientific medicine into the process of childbirth in eighteenth century Britain. As a male physician practicing in childbirth and female reproductive health (man-midwife), Smellie ...
    • William Stewart Halsted (1852-1922) 

      Abboud, Carolina
      William Stewart Halsted was a surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, during the late 1800s and early 1900s. In 1894 Halsted described his procedure for treating breast cancer by removing the breast tissue, ...
    • William Thomas Astbury (1898–1961) 

      Hernandez, Victoria
      William Thomas Astbury studied the structures of fibrous materials, including fabrics, proteins, and deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, in England during the twentieth century. Astbury employed X-ray crystallography, a technique ...
    • William Thornton Mustard (1914-1987) 

      Caudle, Daniella
      William Thornton Mustard was a surgeon in Canada during the twentieth century who developed surgical techniques to treat children who had congenital heart defects. Mustard has two surgeries named after him, both of which ...
    • William Withey Gull (1816-1890) 

      Abboud, Alexis
      William Withey Gull studied paraplegia, anorexia, and hormones as a physician in England during the nineteenth century. In addition to caring for patients, he described the role of the posterior column of the spinal cord ...
    • Wolbachia 

      Prevot, Karine (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2015-01-29)
      Bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are bacteria that live within the cells of their hosts. They infect a wide range of arthropods (insects, arachnids, and crustaceans) and some nematodes (parasitic roundworms). Scientists ...
    • The Woman Rebel (1914) 

      Horwitz, Rainey
      In the early twentieth century, birth control advocate Margaret Sanger published eight issues of a feminist magazine called The Woman Rebel. During this time, discussion of sex education, birth control, and ...
    • The Y-Chromosome in Animals 

      Haskett, Dorothy R. (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2015-05-28)
      The Y-chromosome is one of a pair of chromosomes that determine the genetic sex of individuals in mammals, some insects, and some plants. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the development of new microscopic and ...
    • The Yale Embryo 

      Smith, Kaitlin (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      In 1934 a fourteen-day-old embryo was discovered during a postmortem examination and became famous for being the youngest known human embryo specimen at the time. The embryo was coined "the Yale Embryo," named after the ...
    • York v. Jones (1989) 

      Chapman, Jennifer E. (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2013-10-07)
      In the case York v. Jones (1989), the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia was one of the first US courts to address a dispute over a cryopreserved preembryo. Steven York and Risa Adler-York ...
    • York v. Jones [Brief] (1989) 

      Heathcotte, Brock (Arizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia., 2012-05-10)
      The court treated frozen embryos possessed by an in vitro fertilization clinic as property owned by the parents and held under a bailment contract by the clinic. As such, the contract between the parties controlled disposition ...
    • Your Baby’s Sex: Now You Can Choose (1970), by David M. Rorvik and Landrum B. Shettles 

      Blight, Alysse
      In the book Your Baby’s Sex: Now You Can Choose, David Michael Rorvik and Landrum Brewer Shettles describe methods that couples can use prior to and during conception that will increase the chances of producing a child of ...