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dc.contributor.editorDarby, Alexisen_US
dc.creatorNott, Rohinien_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-02T08:34:20Zen_US
dc.date.available2021-05-02T08:34:20Zen_US
dc.date.created2021-05-02en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hpsrepository.asu.edu/handle/10776/13258en_US
dc.description.abstractPublished in 2002, prostate cancer researcher John R. Masters authored a review article HeLa Cells 50 Years On: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly that described the historical and contemporary context of the HeLa cell line in research in Nature Reviews Cancer. The HeLa cell line was one of the first documented immortal cell lines, isolated from cervical cancer patient Henrietta Lacks in 1951 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. An immortal cell line is a cluster of cells that continuously multiply on their own outside of the original host. Though the HeLa cell line has contributed to many biomedical research advancements such as the polio vaccine, its usage in research has been controversial for many reasons, including that Lacks was a Black woman who did not knowingly donate her cells to science. In the article “HeLa Cells 50 Years On: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly,” Masters describes that, despite the benefits of the HeLa cell line, it has caused significant negative impacts on research due to its propensity to contaminate other cell lines, which can potentially invalidate research findings.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectLiteratureen_US
dc.subject.lcshCell linesen_US
dc.subject.lcshContinuous cell linesen_US
dc.subject.lcshCCLs (Continuous cell lines)en_US
dc.subject.lcshReproductive cellsen_US
dc.subject.lcshSurface contaminationen_US
dc.subject.meshHeLa Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshHeLa-KB Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshDNA Contaminationen_US
dc.subject.meshEquipment Contaminationen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshReliability and Validityen_US
dc.subject.meshReliability of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Findingsen_US
dc.subject.meshTest-Retest Reliabilityen_US
dc.subject.meshValidity of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshOffice of Research Integrityen_US
dc.title“HeLa Cells 50 Years On: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly” (2002), by John R. Mastersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoPublicationsen_US
dc.subject.taginfinite cell linesen_US
dc.subject.tagimmortal cell linesen_US
dc.subject.taglaboratory cross-contaminationen_US
dc.subject.tagresearch integrityen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US


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