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dc.contributor.editorDarby, Alexisen_US
dc.creatorSchnebly, Risa Ariaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-03T05:27:54Zen_US
dc.date.available2021-03-03T05:27:54Zen_US
dc.date.created2021-03-02en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hpsrepository.asu.edu/handle/10776/13233en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 1972, Peter Mazur, Stanley Leibo, and Ernest Chu published, “A Two-Factor Hypothesis of Freezing Injury: Evidence from Chinese Hamster Tissue-culture Cells,” hereafter, “A Two-Factor Hypothesis of Freezing Injury,” in the journal, Experimental Cell Research. In the article, the authors uncover that exposure to high salt concentrations and the formation of ice crystals within cells are two factors that can harm cells during cryopreservation. Cryopreservation is the freezing of cells to preserve them for storage, study, or later use. Mazur originally suggested the two factors in a 1970 paper, but that article was based on evidence from simple yeast cells. By using hamster cells in 1972, Mazur, Leibo, and Chu confirmed that Mazur’s two-factor hypothesis applied to more complex mammalian cells. The article dispelled the widely accepted notion that rapid cooling rates were safest for all cells, and instead showed that each kind of cell had a different optimal cooling rate depending on the solution in which it froze.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectLiteratureen_US
dc.subject.lcshCryopreservation of organs, tissues, etcen_US
dc.subject.lcshLow temperature preservation of organs, tissues, etcen_US
dc.subject.lcshCryonicsen_US
dc.subject.lcshCryosurgeryen_US
dc.subject.lcshMedicine--History--20th centuryen_US
dc.subject.lcshOsmosisen_US
dc.subject.lcshMedicine--United States--Historyen_US
dc.subject.meshCryopreservationen_US
dc.subject.meshCryofixationen_US
dc.subject.meshCryonic Suspensionen_US
dc.subject.meshFreezingen_US
dc.subject.meshFreezing Point Temperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshCrystallizationen_US
dc.subject.meshX-Ray Repair Complementing Defective Repair In Chinese Hamster Cells 9 Proteinen_US
dc.title“A Two-Factor Hypothesis of Freezing Injury: Evidence from Chinese Hamster Tissue-Culture Cells” (1972), by Peter Mazur, Stanley Leibo, and Ernest Chuen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoPublicationsen_US
dc.subject.embryoTheoriesen_US
dc.subject.tagfrozen cellsen_US
dc.subject.tagtwo-factor hypothesisen_US
dc.subject.taghamster tissue-culture cellsen_US
dc.description.typeArticlesen_US


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