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dc.contributor.editorTuoti, Whitney Alexandraen_US
dc.creatorWellner, Karen Linette
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-06T20:51:31Z
dc.date.available2020-11-06T20:51:31Z
dc.date.created2020-11-06
dc.identifier.urihttps://hpsrepository.asu.edu/handle/10776/13182
dc.description.abstractHaeckel believed that the development of an embryo revealed the adult stages of the organism’s ancestors. Haeckel represented this idea with drawings of vertebrate embryos at similar developmental stages. This is Haeckel’s embryo grid, the most common of all illustrations in biology textbooks. Yet, Haeckel’s embryo grids are much more complex than any textbook explanation. I examined 240 high school biology textbooks, from 1907 to 2010, for embryo grids. I coded and categorized the grids according to accompanying discussion of (a) embryonic similarities (b) recapitulation, (c) common ancestors, and (d) evolution.en_US
dc.format.mediumtext/xhtmlen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subject.lcshSchool-booksen_US
dc.subject.lcshTextbooksen_US
dc.subject.lcshEmbryosen_US
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshEmbryo Developmenten_US
dc.titleDissertation: Lessons from Embryos: Haeckel’s Embryo Drawings, Evolution, and Secondary Biology Textbooksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoPublicationsen_US
dc.subject.embryoPeopleen_US
dc.subject.tagHaeckelen_US
dc.description.typeEssays and Thesesen_US


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