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dc.creatorPribadi, Amy
dc.date2016-10-12en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-12T18:04:35Z
dc.date.available2016-10-12T18:04:35Z
dc.date.created2016-10-12
dc.date.issued2016-10-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/11362
dc.descriptionObject is a digital image with two parts that together show the Neurospora life cycle. The left part shows the asexual reproductive cycle of the mold. The right part shows the sexual reproductive cycle of the mold.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis diagram shows the life cycle of Neurospora crassa, a mold that grows on bread. N. crassa can reproduce through an asexual cycle or a sexual cycle. The asexual cycle (colored as a purple circle), begins in this figure with (1a) vegetative mycelium, which are strands of mature fungus. Some of the strands form bulbs (2a) in a process called conidiation. From those bulbs develop the conidia, which are spores. Next, (3a) a single conidium separates from its strand and elongates until it forms mycelium. The sexual cycle (colored as an orange circle) also starts with the (1b) vegetative mycelium. The strands develop into a structure called the proto-perithecium, and reproduction involves the proto-perithecium interacting with the conidia from a different mycelium. Reproduction also involves two mating types, called type A and type a. In reproduction, type A pairs with type a, and a conidium can be of either type, as can a proto-perithecium. A proto-perithecium fertilized by a conidium of the opposite mating type (2b) will develop into a perithecium. Inside the perithecium, croziers develop and mature into asci. (3b) In a maturing ascus, there are two nuclei (one represented as a white circle and one as a black circle), one of which comes from the conidium and the other from the proto-perithecium. Each nuclei has only one set of chromosomes (haploid). The two haploid nuclei fuse into a diploid nucleus (represented as a half black half white circle). The nucleus then divides, separating into two nuclei each with one set of chromosomes. Those nuclei duplicate themselves (represented as two white circles and two black circles), and then all the nuclei duplicate themselves again (represented as four white circles and four black circles). This process yields eight haploid ascospores within a mature ascus. Ascospores are spores, and function for the mold as do seeds for plants. The mature perithecium releases its ascospores (4b), which germinate and grow into mycelium. In the 1930s and 1940s, George Beadle and Ed Tatum collected the spores of irradiated N. crassa to study how genes produced enzymes.en_US
dc.format.mediumjpg | tifen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subject.lcshPink bread molden_US
dc.subject.lcshMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshBeadle, George Wells, 1903-1991en_US
dc.subject.lcshSporeen_US
dc.subject.lcshMicroscopyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurospora crassaen_US
dc.subject.meshgrowthen_US
dc.subject.meshdevelopmenten_US
dc.titleNeurospora crassa Life Cycleen_US
dc.typeImageen_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoOrganismsen_US
dc.subject.embryoProcessesen_US
dc.subject.embryoTheoriesen_US
dc.description.typeGraphicsen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2016-10-12en_US
dc.relation.references"Basic Cell Structure." Fungal Genetics Stock Center. April 28, 2004. http://www.fgsc.net/neurospora/sectionb3.htm (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dc.relation.referencesBeadle, George Wells, and Edward Lawrie Tatum. "Genetic Control of Biochemical Reactions in Neurospora." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 27 (1941): 499-505. http://www.pnas.org/content/27/11/499.full.pdf+html (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dc.relation.referencesBorkovich, Katherine A., et al. "Lessons from the Genome Sequence of Neurospora crassa: Tracing the Path from Genomic Blueprint to Multicellular Organism." Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews 68 (2004): 1-108. http://mmbr.asm.org/content/68/1/1/F1.expansion.html (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dc.relation.referencesLeeder, Abigail C., Javier Palma-Guerrero, and Glass, N. Louise. "The social network: deciphering fungal language." Nature Reviews Microbiology 9 (2011): 440-51. http://www.nature.com/nrmicro/journal/v9/n6/fig_tab/nrmicro2580_F1.html (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dc.relation.references"Life Cycle." Fungal Genetics Stock Center. August 4, 2004. http://www.fgsc.net/neurospora/sectionb2.htm (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dc.description.procedureImage and labels created with a Wacom Graphire 3 tablet using Adobe Photoshop CS5.1 and Adobe Illustrator CS5.1. Made on a Windows 10 PC with Intel i7 CPU. Colors chosen to meet Adobe's color blindness quality standards. Image revised over the course of ten weeks in 2015.en_US
dwc.scientificNameNeurospora crassaen_US
dwc.nameAccordingToShear, Cornelius Lott, and Bernard Ogilvie Dodge. Life histories and heterothallism of the red bread-mold fungi of the Monilia sitophila group. Washington D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 1927. http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/IND43967403/PDF (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dwc.genusNeurosporaen_US
dwc.specificEpithetcrassaen_US
dc.contributer.editorCrowe, Nathanen_US


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