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dc.creatorPribadi, Amy
dc.date2016-10-12en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-12T17:27:36Z
dc.date.available2016-10-12T17:27:36Z
dc.date.created2016-10-12
dc.date.issued2016-10-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10776/11361
dc.descriptionObject is a digital image with two panes, one on top of the other, both of which picture the area within a cell between the nucleus and the cell membrane. The top pane represent three genes within the cell nucleus, each of which produces a distinct kind of enzyme outside of the nucleus. Those enzymes then function in three distinct kinds of metabolic reactions. The bottom pane represents the same situation, except the second gene is damaged by x-rays and can't produce its enzymes. As a result, two of the three metabolic reactions fail to happen.en_US
dc.description.abstractBetween 1934 and 1945, George Beadle developed a hypothesis that each gene within the chromosomes of organisms each produced one enzyme. Enzymes are types of proteins that can catalyze reactions inside cells, and the figure shows that each enzyme controls a stage in a series of biochemical reactions. The top box in this figure represents a normal process of enzyme production and biochemical reactions, and the bottom box shows how Beadle's experiments affected the normal biochemical process. In this figure, each box represents the borders of the cell, and the dashed lines inside the box represent the nucleus. In the normal cell depiction, three genes (represented as colored rectangles) in the nucleus influence the production of three corresponding enzymes (represented as colored squares). The collections of black circles, orange triangles, green squares, and purple circles represent organic molecules, which the enzymes affect through metabolic reactions. In the normal box, gene 3 somehow produces enzyme 3, which catalyzes a reaction in which the first two molecules combine to form a larger molecule. Enzyme 2 catalyzes the second step in the reaction in which the enzyme modifies the chemical composition of the molecule. Enzyme 3 catalyzes the third step in the reaction in which a carbon atom is added to the molecule. This figure also represents an abnormal process (bottommost box) of enzyme production and biochemical reactions. In the abnormal process, X-rays damaged gene 2, preventing the production of enzyme 2. As a result, neither the second nor the third steps of the chemical reaction can occur.en_US
dc.format.mediumjpg | tifen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona State University. School of Life Sciences. Center for Biology and Society. Embryo Project Encyclopedia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmbryo Project Encyclopediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subject.lcshCellsen_US
dc.subject.lcshBeadle, George Wells, 1903-1992en_US
dc.subject.lcshCalifornia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshStanford Universityen_US
dc.subject.lcshgeneticsen_US
dc.subject.lcshEnzymesen_US
dc.subject.lcshGenesen_US
dc.subject.meshAmino Acidsen_US
dc.titleBeadle's One Gene-One Enzyme Hypothesisen_US
dc.typeImageen_US
dc.rights.licenseLicensed as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.subject.embryoTheoriesen_US
dc.subject.embryoProcessesen_US
dc.subject.tagGeneticsen_US
dc.description.typeGraphicsen_US
dc.date.createdstandard2016-10-12en_US
dc.relation.referencesBeadle, George W. "Genes and Biological Enigmas." American Scientist 36 (1947): 69-74. http://www.jstor.org/stable/27826203 (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dc.relation.referencesBeadle, George Wells, and Edward Lawrie Tatum. "Genetic Control of Biochemical Reactions in Neurospora." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 27 (1941): 499-505. http://www.pnas.org/content/27/11/499.full.pdf+html (Accessed January 13, 2016).en_US
dc.description.procedureImage and labels created with a Wacom Graphire 3 tablet using Adobe Photoshop CS5.1 and Adobe Illustrator CS5.1. Made on a Windows 10 PC with Intel i7 CPU. Colors chosen to meet Adobe's color blindness quality standards. Image revised over the course of ten weeks in 2015.en_US
dc.contributer.editorCrowe, Nathanen_US


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